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Steel Panthers MBT ~ Frosty Insurgents ~ 04 Infantry Waves

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From: DasTactic
Duration: 34:15

Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLGB6RkFB7ZmMWWH4UJQZdmFaHb-Q7ecNa
Support the channel on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/dastactic

Steel Panthers (WinSPMBT) is available from Shrapnel Games: http://www.shrapnelgames.com/Camo_Workshop/MBT/MBT_page.html

The premise for this series is that a Norwegian Battalion is on a patrol in their frozen north and stumble across a group of insurgents. The plot continues from there as an evil genius mastermind is establishing a secret base bent on world domination. Will our small force prevail? Only time will tell. :) Hopefully will be a fun series.

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spelk
2 hours ago
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Order of Battle | Kriegsmarine | Surface Raiders | Part 4

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From: Paradogs Gamer
Duration: 22:38

Let's Play Order of Battle - Kriegsmarine Campaign

Kriegsmarine is a DLC for the Order of Battle series and it covers the German Navy’s efforts to challenge Allied superiority at sea. From the shores of the Baltic to the deep waters of the Atlantic Ocean, you will lead a smaller varied fleet of destroyers, cruisers and battleships, submarines, seaplanes tenders and carriers, as well as Marines units specialized in amphibious assaults.

In Kriegsmarine we for the first time focus exclusively on the many engagements of the German Navy, as well as alternative “What-if” scenarios involving battles in the North Atlantic.

Since our Pacific Campaign, this is the first that focuses exclusively on naval warfare, and in Europe nonetheless! Your focus is entirely on a German Naval core force. The campaign begins during 1940 where your main goal is to support the Wehrmacht by using your ships to assist them during various operations. Then we move to battles in the Atlantic and the Baltic, and it features several “what-if” situations as well: perhaps you can save the Bismarck, or even employ the Graf Zeppelin carrier!

The icy North Atlantic is unforgiving, and only the finest admirals can see the battle to the end. Will you sail back to the Reich with cheering crowds awaiting your arrival at the docks? Or will your ships become underwater tombs for your men?

Kriegsmarine features 9 different scenarios and many new units featuring naval and air warfare, including several naval bombers and flying boats!

Link to game: http://www.slitherine.com/games/order_of_battle_pacific

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Make sure to subscribe to the channel so you stay up to date on new releases!
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Copyright (c) 2016 The Artistocrats. www.the-artistocrats.com

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spelk
16 hours ago
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Review: Command & Colours: The Great War

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Mention the word ‘Borg’ and many a geek’s ears will prick up with interest. Most will be reliving the assimilation of Star Trek’s Captain Jean-Luc Picard by the cybernetic Borgs. However, there will still be a select few whose first thoughts will turn towards renowned war game designer Richard Borg. Mr Borg is best known for creating the commands and colours system. A system that has driven an array of immensely popular board games recreating battles across a range of periods from the dawn of military history, including feudal Japan, the Napoleonic era and most famously his Second World War epic Memoir ’44.

The commands and colours system condenses wargames into more manageable bite-sized chunks, significantly reducing the time it takes to play and the overall fiddliness . In The Great War players are dealt hands of command and combat cards and given a supply of HQ tokens. Command cards are used to move your troops, for instance an assault left card allows you to move all units on your left flank. By expending HQ tokens players can also use a combat card, these are usually modelled on actual events and tactics to give a sense of realism and historical accuracy.

There is the carrier pigeon card, for instance, which enhances communication to allow you to move extra units, or the charming lice card that infests an enemy unit. After movement, any active units that are within range of the enemy get to roll a bunch of dice with various different icons. The effectiveness of the rolled icons varies depending on such factors as range and terrain. Overall, it is a simplified system that doesn’t appeal to all war game purists, but for the rest of us it is a chance to play soldiers without it becoming a lifelong endeavour.

Zoom in

On one side we have the German forces who usually have to hold on to a defensive position. On opposing side are the British and allied forces, doing their best to reach their objectives, often within a turn limit. The game begins with two non-historic introductory scenarios, followed by a series of 15 missions set in Loos (1915), The Somme (1916), and Vimy Ridge (1917). These scenarios can be tackled in any order. You win by earning a specific number of points by destroying enemy units and for controlling key strategic points on the map.

The crux of The Great War is trench warfare that makes for a game of attrition as you bombard your enemy with heavy artillery attacks and rake them with machine gun fire before even thinking about giving the order to go over the top. The setting isn’t going to be to everyone’s taste as there are no heroic cavalry charges or rumbling tanks corps. The only units available to either side are infantry, grenadiers, machine gunners and reserve artillery, which fire from off the board. The result is that there isn’t a whole lot of variety between the different scenarios - bring on the tanks! The game requires a fair amount of patience as trying to wear down entrenched enemy units is a slow process and initiating an assault too early is a recipe for disaster. Expect to spend an hour or so on each scenario. With the choice of playing as either side, the opportunity of winning extra medals and a decent AI opponent (that can be set at Lieutenant, General, or Field Marshal level), replay value is high.

Zoom out

Start playing the introductory scenario and it will come as a bit of a shock to discover that The Great War does not offer a tutorial. You are immediately thrown into the thick of the action and raw recruits, unfamiliar with the command and colours system, will have no other choice than to immerse themselves in the hefty and rather intimidating rulebook. Even those familiar with the system will struggle to come to grips with the game’s interface, which isn’t explained and so becomes a matter of trial and error. This isn’t helped by the fact that the controls feel as muddy as Flanders Fields and the information icon appears to do nothing at all.

To find out the strengths of a unit or features of a terrain type you don’t just tap the screen but have to also hold your finger down. This results in a range of frustrations when trying to gather information. Tap a unit and you often get information about the terrain type instead, or you can accidently cancel a unit’s movement when all you wanted to do was to check its statistics. Consequently, you find yourself endlessly having to exit the action to refer back to the rulebook. There are other concerns too: most worryingly, there were a few occasions when a combat card didn’t seem to work. I would say that when the original PC version was released the developers were quick to patch some bugs but there are still reports of the ‘Big Show’ and ‘Counter Attack’ cards not working correctly.

Cards

The maps scroll smoothly and allow the action to be viewed from overhead or zoomed-in to a forced 3D close-up perspective. The screen doesn’t centre to show battles so if you opt for a closer viewing point you will have to manually scroll the screen to keep up with the action. The dice animation is annoying since the dice bounce across the battlefield and take longer to settle than a class of five year olds on a windy day. Thankfully, I discovered that the animation could be switched off. Sadly there are no online options so if you want to battle a human opponent the only choice is face-to-face pass and play.

At every step the PC origins of The Great War are plain for all to see - it is obvious that the game hasn’t been optimised for smaller touchscreen devices. The fonts are tiny, the controls unresponsive and the graphics messy and indistinct. The Great War isn’t the first Richard Borg game to be converted to mobile formats, indeed the fantasy themed Battlelore received an impressive five star rated review way back in 2014. Battlelore still looks great and plays smoothly. In comparison, The Great War is shown up as a lazy conversion, with no real thought or effort made to fit the game to a mobile format. As mentioned, the game has a great pedigree and a real solid design. However, the numerous interface problems and steep learning curve means that you have to dig so deep to get it to the action, that you end up doubting if it was worth all the effort.

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spelk
18 hours ago
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Steel Division Normandy 44 (Multiplayer) The Battle of Pointe du Hoc

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From: AgrippaMaxentius
Duration: 46:49

This game keeps getting better! Just an extremely exciting match with a ton of action, don't forget to rate, comment and subscribe! Also don't forget to add me on twitch! https://www.twitch.tv/agrippamaxentius We're going to get a schedule going very soon.

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spelk
1 day ago
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What Remains of Edith Finch

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In What Remains of Edith Finch, you play as a young woman returning to her family home for the first time in a long time. Sound familiar? Well, rest assured that besides the basic premise, this game doesn’t share a great many thematic or story elements with the highly divisive Gone Home. Mechanically, however, the two are highly comparable, as you spend a good amount of time scouring a vast and oddly constructed house and its surrounding areas, in order to uncover the various tragedies that befell each individual member of the Finch family.

What is important here is that every single story that the game tells got to me in some way or another. These moments pull from a variety of storytelling mediums and aesthetic influences: from comic book strips and flip books to traditional children’s tales passed down through the generations. The various deaths are explored through numerous intriguing albeit simple gameplay ideas that serve to break up the exploration of the titular family’s home. They’re almost all strange, engaging and thoroughly melancholy, and I found great pleasure in uncovering what each one had in store for me. It didn’t take long for my somewhat morbid Gashlycrumb Tinies style fascination with each woeful tale to grow into a genuine emotional engagement with both the wider narrative and the smaller stories therein. I found myself longing to get to know this family and all their eccentricities.

I was initially concerned that the near constant narration would grow to feel entirely unnecessary and may perhaps detract from the joy of poking around the house and discovering things about this family myself. However, those fears soon disappeared as I came to accept it as being a vital part of the game’s personality, as well as its tightly paced narrative construction. As I’ve already mentioned, the multiple types of gameplay introduced are all definitely rather simple, and interactions with the environment are minimal. However, in a time where every other game seems to be a 50 + hour open world Action RPG hybrid, smaller and more directed titles such as this can act as a much-needed palate cleanser.

With What Remains of Edith Finch, you’re getting a lovingly crafted and carefully considered 2-3 hour experience that addresses some of the issues that its forebears suffered from. It’s a genuinely engaging experience that I do not begrudge paying full price for in the slightest. Seldom have I seen a game with such weighty themes manage to stick the landing so beautifully in its latter half. Its final moments are deeply felt; not out of some sense of contrived sadness, but due to the impressive degree of emotional maturity that it displays.

Ultimately, the game is an intelligent rumination on mortality and how important it is to remember and celebrate the life of those we loved rather than allowing their death to define them. These are ideas that developers Giant Sparrow have tackled before with their prior title The Unfinished Swan, but rarely has the balance between pathos and poetry been as powerfully done as it is here.

Image result for what remains of edith finch

You might have found some of what I’ve said to be somewhat vague, but I genuinely wouldn’t want to make you feel as though I have lessened your experience of the game by giving away any one of its enchanting surprises or moments of melancholy. All you really need to know is that I strongly urge anyone who has enjoyed similar titles in the past to pick this one up.

However, if you value runtime above all else, and if you struggle to bring yourself to call these types of games, games then you’ve probably already rightly concluded that maybe this isn’t for you, at least not at full-price.

That being said, I’m very hopeful that this one will indeed find an audience that enjoys it and gets as much out of it as I did. It is without a doubt the most emotionally engaging game I’ve played so far this year, and it’s certainly an exciting step in the right direction for narrative-focused gaming experiences.

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spelk
1 day ago
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Ultimate General: Civil War (8) Union Campaign-Ready your Bayonets

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From: AgrippaMaxentius
Duration: 36:28

The delay on our Union Campaign is over, so don't forget to like, comment and subscribe! If you'd like to watch our entire campaign please watch here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JxKnYrOlvmk

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1 day ago
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